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Combination Therapy as a Strategy to Control Infections Caused by Multi- -resistant Bacteria: Current Review

Author(s):

Patricia Hernandez-Rodriguez* and Ludy Pabon Baquero   Pages 1 - 6 ( 6 )

Abstract:


Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) is one of the main challenges of today's medicine because it has become a global problem that affects the treatment of multiple infections and impacts public health. This resistance is caused as the bacteria generate selective pressure-promoting mechanisms to evade the action of conventional drugs, which are also associated with adverse effects. Infections caused by these multi-resistant bacteria potentially reduce the possibility of effective therapy; this situation increases morbidity and mortality and treatment costs. Therefore, to establish combined therapy as a strategy for the control of infections caused by multi-resistant bacteria, a bibliographic search was carried out between 2015 and 2020 in databases such as PubMed, Scopus and Science Direct. The exhaustive review of the articles allowed a critical analysis of the information. Mechanisms were identified for obtaining drugs with antimicrobial potential, their biological activity and the possible effect of their combination against multidrug-resistant bacteria as an alternative for infectious disease control and as a response to reduce the use of antibiotics. Combined therapy is presented as an innovative therapeutic alternative, which uses non-antibiotic substances that can be obtained by three routes: the repositioning of drugs, synthetic substances and natural products. In this way, important elements are provided to guide researches that seek to reduce antimicrobial resistance.

Keywords:

Antimicrobial resistance, infectious disease, drug combination, natural products, combined therapy, Synergistic effects.

Affiliation:

Department of Basic Sciences. BIOMIGEN Research Group (Molecular Biology and Immunogenetics). Universidad de La Salle. Bogotá, Department of Basic Sciences. BIOMIGEN Research Group (Molecular Biology and Immunogenetics). Universidad de La Salle. Bogotá



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