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The Use of Chemical Compounds to Identify the Regulatory Mechanisms of Vertebrate Circadian Clocks

Author(s):

Yoshimi Okamoto-Uchida, Akari Nishimura*, Junko Izawa, Atsuhiko Hattori, Nobuo Suzuki and Jun Hirayama   Pages 1 - 8 ( 8 )

Abstract:


Circadian clocks are intrinsic, time-tracking processes that confer a survival advantage on an organism. Under natural conditions, they follow approximately a 24-h day, modulated by environmental time cues, such as light, to maximize an organism’s physiological efficiency. The exact timing of this rhythm is established by cell-autonomous oscillators called cellular clocks, which are controlled by transcription–translation negative feedback loops. Studies of cell-based systems and whole-animal models have utilized a pharmacological approach in which chemical compounds are used to identify molecular mechanisms capable of establishing and maintaining cellular clocks, such as post-translational modifications of cellular clock regulators, chromatin remodeling of cellular clock target genes’ promoters, and stability control of cellular clock components. In addition, studies with chemical compounds have contributed to the characterization of light-signaling pathways and their impact on the cellular clock. Here, the use of chemical compounds to study the molecular, cellular, and behavioral aspects of the vertebrate circadian clock system are described.

Keywords:

circadian clock, cellular clock, clock protein, transcription, light, zebrafish

Affiliation:

Division of Medicinal Safety Science, National Institute of Health Sciences, Tokyo, Department of Clinical Engineering, Faculty of Health Sciences, Komatsu University, Komatsu, Ishikawa, Department of Clinical Engineering, Faculty of Health Sciences, Komatsu University, Komatsu, Ishikawa, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Ichikawa, Chiba, Noto Marine Laboratory, Division of Marine Environmental Studies, Institute of Nature and Environmental Technology, Kanazawa University, Noto-cho, Ishikawa 927-0553, Department of Clinical Engineering, Faculty of Health Sciences, Komatsu University, Komatsu, Ishikawa



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